2011 Fall Home Tour Preview I
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N. Winnetka Ave. - Kessler Park


This post-war 1947 Tudor Revival home sits on a double lot at the southeast corner of the Kessler Square subdivision. Originally platted in 1923, the majority of lots in this area are laid out on a tight grid, with a regularity of setbacks, stylistic influences, scale, and materials. The majority of this subdivision was built during the 1920's and 1930's with a variety of revival-style cottages and contemporary bungalows.

Although new building materials and styles were utilized in 1947, this home was built in the same fashion as neighboring Tudor homes built in the 1920 and 1930s; the walls have 6” shiplap under the sheetrock and the windows are weighted wood with waive glass panes. Also original are a separate two-car garage, servant’s quarters, and wash room, where laundry was done until the most recent renovations.

During the renovation process a former occupant from the 1960s stopped to visit. Then the owners learned that their 3/1 home originally had 2 bedrooms and the master bedroom featured a large sitting area that is now a separate bedroom.

The current owner’s renovations include the addition of a second bath and laundry area while remaining within the original boundaries of the home’s footprint. The changes also included adding an entry hall to the living room, and opening up the central part of the home with a hallway that leads to the bed and bathrooms.



Since much of the home’s original charm has been lost over the years, careful attention was made in selecting period fixtures and finishes. Pay close attention to the sconces above the fireplace and in the hallway, as well as the dining room chandelier. You may also notice the repeated use of the “Tudor Arch” throughout the house, including the fireplace and bathrooms.

Although no renovations were made to the kitchen, particular care was taken to restore the butler’s pantry and new appliances were added. As you exit through the garden, you will see the owner’s love of Japanese Maples. With everything old being new again, this home’s renovation maximizes space and practicality while preserving the warmth and historical integrity of the home.