Fall Home Tour Preview I
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Ivanadell / North Cliff Conservation District

This charming and unique Spanish Eclectic home was built in 1927 although the address doesn’t actually show up in the city’s telephone directories until 1933.  It was the first home built on the street and sat alone for six years.  The original owner was a contractor who had built similar but much larger homes on Colorado Blvd. around the same time.  He built his own 1000 square foot home here using similar materials and design elements from those mansions.

In an effort to preserve the character and architectural integrity of their neighborhood, area residents began the process of forming a conservation district.  The North Cliff Conservation District (CD 9) was formally created by the city of Dallas in 1994.  The five recognized architectural styles targeted for preservation are Tudor Revival, Arts and Crafts, Minimal Traditional, Spanish Eclectic and Prairie Foursquare.  The purpose of the district is to preserve these styles through architectural guidelines, development standards, and special provisions including zoning, land uses and setbacks.  The ordinance would ultimately save this home from the wrecking ball ten years later. 




  In 2004 a developer purchased this property with the intent to demolish the structure and build a spec house.  The home had fallen into disrepair and had been condemned by the city.  The CD 9 ordinance however dictated that only a Spanish Eclectic house of similar architectural elements and size was allowed.  The new owners elected to restore the home and added a new addition onto the rear. 



  Inside only the doors, hand scraped oak floors and fireplace surround are original; practically everything else had to be replaced. The current owner has borrowed from the eclectic theme of the home’s façade and filled the inside with family heirlooms, flea market finds, gently used modern classics and outsider art from primarily Texas artists.  The eclecticism continues with the gardens.  The back lawn has been allowed to go wild with Texas wild flowers in the spring, sunflowers during summer and cosmos in the fall.  Plant collections are found growing in unusual places including on the roof, up the walls and hanging in the trees.